All good things…

This will be the final update for Enlades. During a break from posting in the last three months; it’s become clear that myself and Thom no longer have the time and involvement in Second Life or OpenSim environments to continue with the plans we originally had for further guides and tips.

One of the things that you learn is how swiftly these worlds can change and how people can come and go with the speed of light. We’ve been fortunate to have seen and shared many incredible events and experiences over nearly five years. It has been a pleasure and passion, for the last two years, to share our own and others’ methods and ideas to make the creativity, imagination and usage of virtual worlds accessible. Our posts will remain in place for the foreseeable future, to offer suggestions and help to people who have yet to explore the richness of virtual environments.

We would both like to thank our readers and the people who we’ve come across, spent time with and been inspired by. The world-building and the people willing to give their time, knowledge and friendship has been an amazing journey. One that we will not forget as it has enriched our lives and given us many opportunities that would have been difficult, if not impossible, to discover elsewhere.

The inspiration will continue to be passed from mind to mind and that is no small thing to achieve. This is how worlds change and grow, as well as the people within them.

Thank you all!

Farewell and good luck.

Belochka Shostakovich and Thom Lunasea

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Introduction to creating and uploading mesh models

Thom Lunasea with mesh coffee cup (image from Second Life)

This blog post tries to provide information to those who are looking for a starter tutorial on preparing mesh models and getting them in-world.

Mesh models, just like sculpted prims, are created outside of the virtual environment using third-party software and imported in-world by uploading the model in a particular format. The only file format currently supported is COLLADA, which uses the .dae file extension. Most professional and free modelling software have support for exporting 3D models to this format. Over these guides, we will use the popular and free Blender software to illustrate the process of modeling, texturing, exporting and importing the model. Continue reading

Coming soon! A guide to mesh

Blender model render by Belochka Shostakovich (partly based on a great tutorial at BlenderCookie by Jonathan Williamson. I ❤ JW!)

 

An announcement for our readers: Thom Lunasea is currently planning and writing what will be an ongoing series of posts on creating and uploading mesh objects.

It’s a subject we’re both still learning, so covering rigged mesh is not possible as yet, but we hope that the posts will provide useful information. The tutorials will be based in Second Life but are meant to assist residents of other virtual worlds where similar mesh capabilities are supported.

The first post will be on how to use an enabled viewer’s upload screen for an unrigged mesh object. Thom will be providing a download of a simple object he has created, licensed under a non-commercial Creative Commons license, as part of the tutorial.

We’re both looking forward to exploring this subject further!

Virtual World viewers: Part 7 – Other third-party viewers

Originally, I’d planned on doing one further review. Unfortunately I was not able to do that but I’m including information on three other viewers I haven’t tested.

Continue reading

Virtual World viewers: Part 6 – Linden Lab official viewer

In Part Six I’m looking at the official viewer for Second Life: Linden Lab’s V3 client. There are different versions available from Linden Lab for development viewer betas and others that focus on Inventory management or Market Place delivery functions. This review is for the main stable release: 3.2.8.248931.

Let’s take a closer look.

Continue reading

Virtual World viewers: Part 5 – Firestorm

In Part Five I’m looking at a third-party viewer which has achieved prominence in Second Life. Firestorm is a V3 series client that comes from the same development team as the Phoenix viewer.

Let’s take a closer look.

Continue reading

Virtual World viewers: Part 4 – Exodus

From Part 4 onwards I’m going to be looking at viewers that are based on V2 or V3 code. Linden Labs launched Viewer 2 in 2010, bringing a new look to the User Interface and new functions to Second Life.

This review will be looking at a third-party viewer based on V3 code: Exodus.

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Virtual World viewers: Part 3 – Phoenix

In this review I’m looking at the well-known third-party viewer Phoenix. Originally I’d intended to review an older version but decided to try the more recent 1.6.0.1600 release. This is the team’s development to offer mesh-viewing capabilities.

I started using an older Phoenix version in 2011 when I became interested in some of the features that the Imprudence viewer did not have. Using this mesh-enabled viewer is a new experience for me. So, let’s take a closer look.

Continue reading

Virtual World viewers: Part 2 – Imprudence

This is a review of a third-party viewer I’ve used extensively in SL and OpenSim regions. Imprudence 1.3.2 release was made available in early 2011. As this post is image intensive, please continue to read after the cut.

Continue reading

Virtual World viewers: Basic Information

As explained in Virtual World viewers: Part 1 I’m going be testing different viewers for basic, Mac-friendly, useability in Second Life.

Before starting the reviews it might be helpful to new users to explain some of the differences between viewer use.

For Second Life users: there is only one official viewer series – Linden Lab’s own. Every other viewer available has been developed outside of Linden Lab, which is why they are called Third-Party Viewers (often shortened to “TPVs”). For further reading this wiki page explains more: Second Life Downloads

Two key things to mention: if you do regularly switch between the official Linden Lab viewer and TPVs, or use a third-party viewer all the time, it is useful to know that Linden Lab accepts no responsibility for problems arising from installing anything but their own official viewer. If you have concerns about security or privacy issues the most usual advice is to not download and install a viewer on your computer.

There are no longer any official Viewer 1 releases available from Linden Lab. Support for Viewer 1 in Second Life will be withdrawn at some point, although a definite date for this has not been clearly stated (to my knowledge at the time of writing).

For OpenSim users: there is no single, official viewer. This is left entirely to the choice of the individual and what works best for them. In the case of larger grids they may suggest, when signing up, which viewer suits their particular environment.

TPVs, like many other subjects in virtual worlds, can cause heated debate and disagreement. I don’t intend to raise those arguments. I don’t generally find it helpful and these reviews are not in-depth enough to cover every possible discussion.

The review series starts off with Imprudence 1.3.2. This is based on a version of Viewer 1 code. The user interface is distinctly different to Viewer 2 and 3 and will be most familiar to people who started out in SL or OpenSim pre-2010. Viewer 1 remains popular with those who prefer the design and functions or are unable to run more recent viewers.

So, let’s take a closer look with Virtual World viewers: Part 2!